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Carry on : the rise and fall of Simon Snow
2015
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During his last year at Watford School of Magicks, Simon Snow, the Chosen One, faces a magic-eating monster wearing his face, a break-up, and a missing nemesis. - (Baker & Taylor)

"Simon Snow is the worst Chosen One who's ever been chosen.That's what his roommate, Baz, says. And Baz might be evil and a vampire and a complete git, but he's probably right.Half the time, Simon can't even make his wand work, and the other half, he starts something on fire. His mentor's avoiding him, his girlfriend broke up with him, and there's a magic-eating monster running around, wearing Simon's face. Baz would be having a field day with all this, if he were here -- it's their last year at the Watford School of Magicks, and Simon's infuriating nemesis didn't even bother to show up"-- - (Baker & Taylor)

Simon Snow's final year at the Watford School of Magicks is overshadowed by a painful breakup, an overprotective mentor, a roommate's disappearance and a plethora of monsters. By the best-selling author of Attachments. Simultaneous eBook. - (Baker & Taylor)

Rainbow Rowell continues to break boundaries with Carry On, an epic fantasy following the triumphs and heartaches of Simon and Baz from her beloved bestseller Fangirl. - (McMillan Palgrave)

#1 New York Times best seller!
Booklist Editors’ Choice 2015 - Youth!
Named a "Best Book of 2015" by Time Magazine, School Library Journal, Barnes & Noble, NPR, PopSugar, The Millions, and The News & Observer!

Simon Snow is the worst Chosen One who's ever been chosen.

That's what his roommate, Baz, says. And Baz might be evil and a vampire and a complete git, but he's probably right.

Half the time, Simon can't even make his wand work, and the other half, he starts something on fire. His mentor's avoiding him, his girlfriend broke up with him, and there's a magic-eating monster running around, wearing Simon's face. Baz would be having a field day with all this, if he were here--it's their last year at the Watford School of Magicks, and Simon's infuriating nemesis didn't even bother to show up.

Carry On - The Rise and Fall of Simon Snow is a ghost story, a love story and a mystery. It has just as much kissing and talking as you'd expect from a Rainbow Rowell story - but far, far more monsters.

- (McMillan Palgrave)

Author Biography

Rainbow Rowell writes books. Sometimes she writes about adults (Attachments and Landline). Sometimes she writes about teenagers (Eleanor & Park, Fangirl and Carry On). But she always writes about people who talk a lot. And people who feel like they're screwing up. And people who fall in love.

When she's not writing, Rainbow is reading comic books, planning Disney World trips and arguing about things that don't really matter in the big scheme of things.

She lives in Nebraska with her husband and two sons.

- (McMillan Palgrave)

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Trade Reviews

Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* It's Simon Snow's last year at the Watford School of Magicks, and it's not going as planned. His magic, always unstable, has been even more unpredictable, which is bad news with the magical world's most infamous bad guy after him. His girlfriend is distant, and he's afraid he'll lose touch with his best friend after graduation. But most unsettling of all, Simon's frustrating, evil, pretty-sure-he's-a-vampire nemesis/roommate hasn't come back to school. Baz is probably just off plotting somewhere, but what if he's really in trouble? And why does Simon care so much, anyway? Rowell's debut fantasy was first alluded to in Fangirl (2013) as a Harry Potter–like phenomenon. The similarities are, at first, easy to spot, and this does lag a bit in comparison—seven years of world-building don't easily fit into the first 150 pages. But things accelerate once Baz hits the stage, quickly taking on new life and heart. Rowell has created a story that is as much a loving critique of the "Chosen One" narrative as it is an example of the genre. The romance, once it gets going, is irresistible and surprisingly tender, but the true strength here is the characterizations: sleek, tough-talking bad-boy Baz; beautiful but reluctant Agatha; clever and exuberant Penelope; and the brilliant, unhinged Mage, who leads the school, are all paid careful attention. And at the center of it all is Simon, the Chosen One himself, made special by circumstance and, like anyone, just trying to figure out a way to keep going. Stock up on copies—this one begs to be reread.HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Simon and Baz have been garnering attention since they first appeared in Fangirl, and buzz has been building for their feature-length debut. Add in Rowell's history of critical and commercial success, and you've got yourself a hit. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews

In this Fangirl companion novel, Simon Snow, the most powerful mage in centuries, uncovers secrets that call into question his beliefs about good and evil. He also realizes that his obsession with his probably-a-vampire roommate Baz may not be purely antagonistic. The novel is longer than it needs to be--just kiss already, Simon and Baz--but there's much to enjoy along the way.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews

In Fangirl (rev. 11/13), protagonist Cath wrote fanfiction for the fictitious "Simon Snow" fantasy series. Now Rowell has written a novel set in Simon Snow's universe and using many conventions of fanfiction, most notably "slash" (in this case non-graphic), usually defined as a wish-fulfilling relationship between two characters of the same sex who, in the original work, are not a romantic couple. Simon, the most powerful mage in centuries, uncovers secrets during his final year at Watford School of Magicks that call into question his long-held beliefs about sharp lines between good and evil. He also begins to realize that his obsession with his probably-a-vampire roommate Baz may not be purely antagonistic. The novel is longer than it needs to be—just kiss already, Simon and Baz—and the many alternating narrators are a little dense when it comes to solving several related mysteries. But there's plenty to enjoy along the way, including clever names for spells ("These aren't the droids you're looking for" makes oddities like dragon parts on a human unnoticeable) and plenty of wit. Reading Fangirl first isn't strictly necessary—the brief author's note covers the basics—and the metatextual concept is somewhere on the spectrum between confusing and fascinating, depending on one's perspective. A working knowledge of the Harry Potter books and other popular fandoms isn't absolutely essential either, but it makes this send-up a lot more fun. shoshana fla Copyright 2014 Horn Book Magazine.

Kirkus Reviews

Meta-slash fiction for jaded optimists.Rowell pulls on a central thread of Fangirl (2013)—Cath's fanfic epic of Simon Snow, the Chosen One and Mage's heir—and uses it to weave a tapestry of realigned affections and alliances. Deftly self-contained so that readers need not have read Fangirl to enjoy this tale, it will nonetheless appeal to Harry Potter fans sophisticated enough to recognize the fundamental tropes at work. Simon, an orphaned magician whose power is so immense that he is mostly inept at wielding it, returns to Watford School of Magicks for his final year of education in the magical arts. He has a talented, stalwart friend, a fascinatingly ambiguous foe, and a complicated, emotionally unavailable mentor. There is a great battle between good and evil. But there are also mobile phones, contemporary slang and pop-culture references, and gay romance. Rowell's creation is less preoccupied with the trappings of wizard life than it is focused on the relation ships of the characters. The narrative perspective, shifting among Simon and his supporters and opponents, gives voice to their deeper motivations and angst; the dialogue, both internal and external, is contemporary and occasionally profane, with an authentic level of teenage snark.The novel playfully twists genre conventions—there are plenty of wink-wink, nudge-nudge moments to satisfy faithful fantasy readers—but it also stands alone as a modern bildungsroman. Carry on, Simon Snow. (author's note) (Fantasy. 14 & up) Copyright Kirkus 2015 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

PW Annex Reviews

Rowell's many fans know that the characters in this novel derive from her 2013 book, Fangirl, where they appeared in two forms: the "official" version of a Harry Potterlike series and the funnier, funkier, and gayer fanfic written by Cath, Fangirl's heroine. Now Simon Snow, the greatest magician the world has ever seen; possible vampire Basilton "Baz" Pitch, Simon's roommate and nemesis; and Simon's intrepid and loyal best friend Penelope have their own book. Along with Simon's semi-ex girlfriend Agatha, the three are negotiating their last year at the Watford School of Magicks amid a crisis in the magical world, much of which seems to involve Simon. Although in no way fan fiction (apart from its connections to Fangirl), this book can be read as a tribute to Harry Potter and Lev Grossman's Magicians series, and it's a sterling example of how to use genre conventions to create something new. Seen in that light, it hardly matters that some of the plot twists feel more like confirmations than surprises. Everything else—the funny, wised-up dialogue, the tumultuous, sweet, and sexy love story— is grade-A Rowell, and if you've ever wondered what makes a spell a spell, this book explains all. The doubled suspense—Will Simon and Baz finally admit that seven years of mutual obsession might be more than antagonism? Will Simon, Baz, and Penny figure out what's threatening their world in time to save it?—makes for a book that readers will find almost impossible to put down. Ages 13–up. Agent: Christopher Schelling, Selectric Artists. (Oct.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2015 PWxyz LLC

School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 8 Up—Readers of Rowell's Fangirl (St. Martin's Griffin, 2013) have already had a glimpse at the world of Simon Snow, but now Rowell turns the full force of her imagination on the Watford School of Magic and those connected to it. Magic is disappearing all over England, leaving pockets of dead air that disable any magician in the vicinity. Somehow, everyone knows that the Insidious Humdrum is responsible, but who—or what?—is the Humdrum, and why does he look exactly like 11-year-old Simon? That's not the only mystery at hand, however. Simon's roommate and nemesis, the vampire Baz, disappears for weeks, and while he's gone, the Veil opens and Baz's late mother shows up at their room with a message for her son: her killer, Nicodemus, is still out there. When Baz returns, he's barely more than skin and bones. What has he been doing? And why can't Simon stop thinking about him? Simon and Baz reluctantly declare a truce and join forces, along with the intrepid Penelope Bunce, to find the mysterious Nicodemus. With rock-solid worldbuilding, a sweet and believable romance subplot, and satisfying ending, Rowell's latest is a monumentally enjoyable reading experience. VERDICT Hand this to fans of Rowell, Harry Potter, love stories, and magic.—Stephanie Klose, Library Journal

[Page 121]. (c) Copyright 2015 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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